Showing posts with label speech. Show all posts
Showing posts with label speech. Show all posts

Saturday, 18 May 2013

Multimodal Web-GIS: Augmenting Map Navigation and Spatial Data Visualization with Voice Control

Jacobson, R.D., and Sam, K. (2006) Multimodal Web-GIS: Augmenting Map Navigation and Spatial Data Visualization with Voice Control, AutoCarto 2006, June 26-28, Electronic Proceedings.

Abstract

This paper describes the design and architecture of a prototype project that was implemented to augment the navigation and visualization of geospatial data for a web-GIS application.  This project leverages existing commercial off the shelf (COTS) web-GIS component and open specification Speech Application Language Tags (SALT)  as building blocks for creating a multimodal web-GIS application.  In this paper, we will address how the different technology components were applied for creating a multimodal interfaces for the navigation, interaction and feedback for the web-based GIS application.  The design, integration process and the architecture of the prototype application are covered as a part of this project report.

[VIEW PDF]

Friday, 17 May 2013

Haptic Soundscapes: Developing novel multi-sensory tools to promote access to geographic information

Jacobson, R.D. (2004) Haptic Soundscapes: Developing novel multi-sensory tools to promote access to geographic information. In: Janelle,D., Warf, B., and Hansen, K (eds.) WorldMinds: Geographical Perspectives on 100 problems. Kluwer: Dordrecht, pp 99-103.

Abstract

This essay explores the critical need for developing new tools to promote access to geographic information that have throughout history been conventionally represented by maps. This problem is especially acute for vision-impaired individuals. The need for new tools to access map-like information is driven by the changing nature of maps, from static paper-based products to digital representations that are interactive, dynamic, and
distributed across the Internet. This revolution in the content, display, and availability of geographic representations generates a significant problem and an opportunity. The problem is that for people without sight there is a wealth of information that is inaccessible due the visual nature of computer displays. At the same time the digital nature of geographic information provides an opportunity for making information accessible to non-visual users by presenting the information in different sensory modalities in computer interfaces, such as, speech, touch, sound, and haptics (computer generated devices that allow users to interact with and to feel information).

[VIEW PDF]
 

Thursday, 16 May 2013

Navigating maps with little or no sight: A novel audio-tactile approach

Jacobson, R.D. (1998) Navigating maps with little or no sight: A novel audio-tactile approach. Proceedings of Content Visualization and Intermedia Representations. August 15, University of Montreal, Montreal.
Abstract 

This paper first presents a review of the options available for conveying maps and graphics to visually impaired and blind people. A novel audio-tactile methodology is described, and the results from its pilot study reported. Communication of spatial media, such as map, is problematic without sight. Tactile perception is serial rather
than synoptic. By building a working model of the environment that is uses both tactile and auditory feedback, a map is made far more accessible. Results from the pilot study demonstrated simplicity and enjoyment of use of this novel approach which integrates speech, verbal landmarks, earcons and recorded environmental sound
to build a small spatial hypermedia system.