Showing posts with label internet. Show all posts
Showing posts with label internet. Show all posts

Saturday, 18 May 2013

Multimodal Interfaces for Representing and Accessing Geospatial Information

Golledge, R.G., Rice, M., and Jacobson, R.D. (2006) Multimodal Interfaces for Representing and Accessing Geospatial Information. In: Rana, S. and Sharma, J. (eds.) Frontiers of Geographic Information Technology. Springer-Verlag: Berlin & New York, pp 181-208.

 Abstract

Multimodal interfaces have a great potential impact in our daily lives and in the education of students in all grades.  In particular, they offer significant benefits for people who are disabled.  The use of tactile, haptic, and auditory interfaces has a potential to make technology more universally accessible.  To this extent it will
mitigate the rapidly expanding digital divide between those who are able to use computers to access the Internet and web page information (i.e., those who  are computer literate) and those who are not.
Information technology transformations are affecting how we communicate, how we store and access information, how we become healthier and receive more medical care, how we learn at different stages of our development, how business is conducted, how work is undertaken in order to produce income, how things are built or designed, how data is stored and managed, and how research is conducted.  With the increasing emphasis on visualization as the main interface medium for computer based services, an ethical problem emerges regarding whether or not people who are visually impaired or who have other tactile, haptic, or auditory impairments should be increasingly disabled by the trend towards digital communication and information processing.  We believe that such groups should not be shut out from the advantages offered by the use of this technology, just as we believe that multimodal interfaces will enrich the understanding of the computer-based input and output of information that is becoming a part of our everyday lives. 

 
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Friday, 17 May 2013

A Commentary on the Use of Touch for Accessing On-Screen Spatial Representations: The Process of Experiencing Haptic Maps and Graphics

Golledge, R.G., Rice, M., and Jacobson, R.D. (2005) A Commentary on the Use of Touch for Accessing On-Screen Spatial Representations: The Process of Experiencing Haptic Maps and Graphics. The Professional Geographer, 57 (3). 339-349.

Abstract

The growth of the Internet and the digital revolution have meant increased reliance on electronic representations of information. Geospatial information has been readily adapted to the world of cyberspace, and most Web pages incorporate graphics, images, or maps to represent spatial and spatialized data. But flat computer screens do not facilitate a map or graph experience by those who are visually impaired. The traditional method for compensating for nonvisual access to maps and graphics has been to construct hard-copy tactile maps. In this article, we examine an electronic accommodation for nonvisual users—the haptic map. Using new and off-the-shelf hardware—force feedback and vibrotactile mice—we explore how touch can be combined with virtual representations of shapes and patterns to enable nonvisual access to onscreen map or graphic material.
Key Words: digital representation, haptic maps, visual impairment

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