Showing posts with label hapticsoundscapes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hapticsoundscapes. Show all posts

Friday, 30 September 2016

Design Considerations for Haptic and Auditory Map Interfaces

Rice, M., Jacobson, R.D., Golledge, R.G., and Jones, D. (2005) Design Considerations for Haptic and Auditory Map Interfaces. Cartography and Geographic Information Science, 32 (4), 381-391http://dx.doi.org/10.1559/152304005775194656


Abstract

Communicating spatial information to the blind and visually impaired using maps and graphics presents many difficulties. Past research has offered advice to cartographers on topics such as tactile areal, point, and line symbolization; on perceptual problems related to dense linear features on tactile maps; and on the relationship between categorical data, measurement theory, and tactile discrimination. With this previous work as a foundation, we describe our research efforts with haptic and auditory maps - the Haptic Soundscapes Project. Haptic Soundscapes maps allow blind and visually-impaired individuals to feel map features through force feedback devices and hear auditory cues that add both redundant and complementary information. Recent experimental work by the authors has led to several recommended practices for cartographic data simplification, object size discrimination, shape identification, and general interface navigation. The authors also present haptic and auditory mapping examples to illustrate design ideas, algorithms, and technical requirements. Future prospects for automated haptic and auditory map creation are discussed and presented in the context of the past work in generating maps for the blind and visually impaired from cartographic data.

[VIEW PDF]

Friday, 17 May 2013

Haptic Soundscapes: Developing novel multi-sensory tools to promote access to geographic information

Jacobson, R.D. (2004) Haptic Soundscapes: Developing novel multi-sensory tools to promote access to geographic information. In: Janelle,D., Warf, B., and Hansen, K (eds.) WorldMinds: Geographical Perspectives on 100 problems. Kluwer: Dordrecht, pp 99-103.

Abstract

This essay explores the critical need for developing new tools to promote access to geographic information that have throughout history been conventionally represented by maps. This problem is especially acute for vision-impaired individuals. The need for new tools to access map-like information is driven by the changing nature of maps, from static paper-based products to digital representations that are interactive, dynamic, and
distributed across the Internet. This revolution in the content, display, and availability of geographic representations generates a significant problem and an opportunity. The problem is that for people without sight there is a wealth of information that is inaccessible due the visual nature of computer displays. At the same time the digital nature of geographic information provides an opportunity for making information accessible to non-visual users by presenting the information in different sensory modalities in computer interfaces, such as, speech, touch, sound, and haptics (computer generated devices that allow users to interact with and to feel information).

[VIEW PDF]